DOES VIÑA LANCIANO WEEP?

DOES VIÑA LANCIANO WEEP?

6 March, 2019 By Bodegas LAN

The vine is a plant that becomes dormant over the winter months. During this period, the vines look like they are sleeping and winter pruning takes place, reducing the length of the canes to create higher quality bunches in the future. But the clearest sign that the vine sap is starting to move up through the plant is what is called “el lloro” or “weeping” in Spanish, or “sap rise” in English, and shows that the vine growth cycle is starting again. A clear liquid called “lágrimas” or “tears” starts to emanate from the pruning cuts: hence the Spanish expression, “the vineyard is weeping.”

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LAN XTRÈME: OUR COMMITMENT TO THE LAND

LAN XTRÈME: OUR COMMITMENT TO THE LAND

8 June, 2018 By Bodegas LAN

Throughout our more than 45 years of history, we have been faithful to our basic principle: “that winemaking starts with vine growing.” This pioneering vision of the care for the raw material and the importance of the origin has formed part of LAN’s DNA to the present day.

Respect for the vineyard ecosystem has been and continues to be, the top priority in our value stream and a constant guide for the work of our field team and the technicians in the winery.

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SUMMER PRUNING IN VIÑA LANCIANO

SUMMER PRUNING IN VIÑA LANCIANO

3 July, 2017 By Bodegas LAN

Summer pruning – or “el desniete” as it is called in Spanish – is a practice that is carried out in the vineyard to remove unnecessary vine shoots that could impair the correct ripening of the bunches. The objective is to better aerate the plant and try to ensure that nutrients are directed to the grapes and do not remain in the leaves.

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Bud break at Viña Lanciano

Bud break at Viña Lanciano

3 November, 2016 By Bodegas LAN
Bud break is the first stage of the return to life for our Viña Lanciano vines. The start of this cycle is signaled by a bleeding of the vine meaning that the sap has started to flow. Tiny buds start to swell and burst indicating the start of a new vintage and a new life cycle for our plants.

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